From OntologPSMW

Jump to: navigation, search
[ ]

Contents

Ontolog Invited Speaker Presentation - Dr. Matthew West - Thu 2015-10-22     (1)

  • Dr. MatthewWest (Information Junction) - "Moving From Third Normal form to a Web-enabled World" slides     (1A)
    • it's best that you listen to the session while having the presentation (linked above) opened in front of you. You'll be prompted to advance slides by the speaker.     (1A1)

Abstract     (1B)

From Third Normal Form to a Web-enabled World     (1B1)

Dr West will present on the changes to the way data has been structured to meet the changing needs of databases over the last 30 years and looking forward to the needs of web enabled data, including the move from realtional databases to triple stores.     (1B2)

Agenda     (1C)

Ontolog Invited Speaker Sessions     (1C1)

Proceedings:     (1D)

Please refer to the above     (1D1)

IM Chat Transcript captured during the session:     (1D2)


-- begin in-session chat-transcript --     (1D3)

Lightly edited chat transcript:

[17:25] Mike Bennett: Tips for speaking / asking questions etc.:     (1D4)

[17:25] Mike Bennett: To un-mute, press "*7" ... To mute, press "*6" (please mute your phone, especially if you are in a noisy surrounding, or if you are introducing noise, echoes, etc. into the conference line.)     (1D5)

During the Q&A / discussion segment (when everyone is muted), If you want to speak or have questions or remarks to make, please raise your hand (virtually) by clicking on the "hand button" (lower right) on the chat session page. You may speak when acknowledged by the session moderator (again, press "*7" on your phone to un-mute).     (1D6)

Test your voice and introduce yourself first before proceeding with your remarks, please.     (1D7)

Please remember to click on the "hand button" again (to lower your hand) and press "*6" on your phone to mute yourself after you are done speaking.     (1D8)

[17:30] Mike Bennett: From Third Normal Form to a Web-enabled World     (1D9)

Dr West will present on the changes to the way data has been structured to meet the changing needs of databases over the last 30 years and looking forward to the needs of web enabled data, including the move from realtional databases to triple stores.     (1D10)

[17:34] Mike Bennett: == Session Starts ==     (1D11)

[17:36] Mike Bennett: Note: there is no screen sharing, so please click on the "slides" link in the session page.     (1D12)

[17:48] Mike Bennett: So is 6NF the same as bitemporality?     (1D16)

[17:56] Mike Bennett: Matthew West mentions an important point: when you are talking about a record and when you are talking about an object the record is about     (1D17)

[17:57] Peter P. Yim: == Q & A     (1D18)

[17:59] Mike Bennett: Please can you also summarize questions in here. Thanks     (1D19)

[18:00] Mike Bennett: Matthew West recommends using very high levels of normalization, to address the issues summarized here.     (1D20)

[18:01] Steve Ray: My question was, what kinds of design guidance would you give to a new modeler today?     (1D21)

[18:01] Todd Schneider: What does 'normalization' mean for ontology development?     (1D22)

[18:04] Amanda Vizedom: There are also ontology-native senses of normalization, e.g., logically, to CNF or DNF, and ontological, related to implicit entities, relationships, context...     (1D23)

[18:07] Mike Bennett: Observation: ontologies don't always say enough about the context.     (1D24)

[18:08] BethDigiulian: Can you explain where the sub-attributes such as weight, height and marital status on slide 7 end up in your 7NF slide 11.     (1D25)

[18:08] Todd Schneider: CNF? DNF?     (1D26)

[18:08] Tara Athan: CNF = conjunctive normal form     (1D27)

[18:09] BethDigiulian: and what is the difference between record_created and record_copy_created     (1D28)

[18:10] Matthew West: @Beth: The record created relates to the original copy, whereas record copy created relates to this copy of the record in this database. There may be a difference.     (1D29)

[18:11] Todd Schneider: How would a 'logical' normal form help uncover semantic conflicts or duplication?     (1D30)

[18:12] Mike Bennett: Normalization is aimed at helping you find a better way to structure the data model but doesn't guarantee it.     (1D31)

[18:15] Amanda Vizedom: @Todd [13:11] Logical normalization is very important whenever (1) the representation language is expressive enough that there is more than one way to represent something, and (2) inference at any given point is partial, that is, you are not continually computing full entailments (as you can't be, in very expressive languages, and usually can't, even in less expressive ones).     (1D32)

[18:17] Tara Athan: Regarding slide 7, I see a difference between properties like height and weight, which is always changing, and marital status, which is constant until an event happens to change it. How do/should fluents enter into data models?     (1D33)

[18:20] BethDigiulian: Great remark!     (1D34)

[18:20] Todd Schneider: Amanda, I agree but there seems to be an assumption that either there's a logical equivalence of the representations, an additional representation that would 'detect' an overlap, or a human or other 'external' entity that understands the intended interpretations of the symbols and thus able to detect the conflict or duplication.     (1D35)

[18:22] Mike Bennett: On Slide 7, also one state is a part of another (not shown). Each state has start and end date and need not be contiguous with others.     (1D36)

[18:23] Amanda Vizedom: @Tara [13:17] This is quite important, I think. For some applications, it's very useful to represent a sort of decay or uncertainty model for different kinds of assertions. Assuming that your data refreshes at a lower frequency than the time period in which might change, you can represent, e.g., whether and how the last-known value should be inferred to still hold, depending on time elapsed.     (1D37)

[18:25] Amanda Vizedom: @Todd [13:20] - I'm thinking of systems (knowledge-base, ontology management, or application) that perform normalization under the hood, including at assert time. External would seem to defeat the purpose.     (1D38)

[18:27] Jim Disbrow: Some of the characteristics are reflexive while others are not (e.g., one is married to another person - so the characteristic is not essentially reflexive - while one's weight is always reflexive). Does OWL or the ISO support reflexivity yet?     (1D39)

[18:29] Matthew West: Yes, again, marital status is a simplification, where the underlying context is that one person is married to another. The marital status is derived from this underlying state.     (1D40)

[18:33] Tara Athan: Actually, there are multiple notions of subclass - e.g. intensional and extensional.     (1D41)

[18:35] Amanda Vizedom: +1 Matthew's point: careful modeling is just as important for ontological models as for RDBs.     (1D42)

[18:36] Todd Schneider: Matthew, Mike, Thank you for an informative and useful presentation. Have to go. Cheers.     (1D43)

[18:41] Amanda Vizedom: @Tara [13:33] Yes, indeed. I meant to say that any language that is specifically built for ontological representation, as far as I can recall, has such a notion defined as a primitive of the language, not subject to user (re-)interpretation. Some such languages, of course, have more than one.     (1D44)

[18:43] nigel: thanks guys - gotta go     (1D45)

[18:44] Jim Disbrow: Yes, thanks again. Bye.     (1D46)

[18:44] Steve Ray: Thanks. Bye.     (1D47)

[18:44] Joel Bender: Thank you!     (1D48)

[18:45] Peter P. Yim: thanks, Matthew & Mike ... great session!     (1D49)

[18:45] Mike Bennett: === Session ends ===     (1D51)

-- end of in-session chat-transcript --     (1D52)

Additional Resources:     (1E)


For the record ...     (1E2)

How To Join (while the session is in progress)     (1F)

  • Dial-in:     (1F5D)
    • Phone (US): +1 (425) 440-5100 ... (long distance cost may apply)     (1F5D1)
    • Skype: join.conference (i.e. make a skype call to the contact with skypeID="join.conference") ... (generally free-of-charge, when connecting from your computer)     (1F5D2)
      • when prompted enter Conference ID: 843758#     (1F5D2A)
      • Unfamiliar with how to do this on Skype? ...     (1F5D2B)
        • Add the contact "join.conference" to your skype contact list first. To participate in the teleconference, make a skype call to "join.conference", then open the dial pad (see platform-specific instructions below) and enter the Conference ID: 843758# when prompted.     (1F5D2B1)
      • Can't find Skype Dial pad? ...     (1F5D2C)
        • for Windows Skype users: Can't find Skype Dial pad? ... it's under the "Call" dropdown menu as "Show Dial pad"     (1F5D2C1)
        • for Linux Skype users: please note that the dial-pad is only available on v4.1 (or later or the earlier Skype versions 2.x,) if the dialpad button is not shown in the call window you need to press the "d" hotkey to enable it. ... (ref.)     (1F5D2C2)
    • instructions: once you got access to the page, click on the "settings" button, and identify yourself (by modifying the Name field from "anonymous" to your real name, like "JaneDoe").     (1F5E1)
    • You can indicate that you want to ask a question verbally by clicking on the "hand" button, and wait for the moderator to call on you; or, type and send your question into the chat window at the bottom of the screen.     (1F5E2)
    • thanks to the soaphub.org folks, one can now use a jabber/xmpp client (e.g. gtalk) to join this chatroom.     (1F5E3)

Just add the room as a buddy - (in our case here) ontolog_20151022@soaphub.org ... Handy for mobile devices!     (1F5F)

  • Discussions and Q & A:     (1F5G)
    • Nominally, when a presentation is in progress, the moderator will mute everyone, except for the speaker.     (1F5G1)
    • To un-mute, press "*7" ... To mute, press "*6" (please mute your phone, especially if you are in a noisy surrounding, or if you are introducing noise, echoes, etc. into the conference line.)     (1F5G2)
    • we will usually save all questions and discussions till after all presentations are through. You are encouraged to jot down questions onto the chat-area in the mean time (that way, they get documented; and you might even get some answers in the interim, through the chat.)     (1F5G3)
    • During the Q&A / discussion segment (when everyone is muted), If you want to speak or have questions or remarks to make, please raise your hand (virtually) by clicking on the "hand button" (lower right) on the chat session page. You may speak when acknowledged by the session moderator (again, press "*7" on your phone to un-mute). Test your voice and introduce yourself first before proceeding with your remarks, please. (Please remember to click on the "hand button" again (to lower your hand) and press "*6" on your phone to mute yourself after you are done speaking.)     (1F5G4)
  • RSVP simply just by adding yourself to the "Expected Attendee" list below (if you are a member of the team.)     (1F5I)
  • Please note that this session may be recorded, and if so, the audio archive is expected to be made available as open content, along with the proceedings of the call to our community membership and the public at-large under our prevailing open IPR policy.     (1F5K)

Attendees:     (1G)

  • Expecting:     (1G2)
    • ... if you are coming to the session, please add your name above (plus your affiliation, if you aren't already a member of the community) above so that we can reserve enough resources to support everyone's participation. ...     (1G3A)