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Session Planning
Duration 1 hour
Date/Time 27 Oct 2021 16:00 GMT
9:00am PDT/12:00pm EDT
5:00pm BST/6:00pm CEST
Convener Ken Baclawski

Contents

Dealing with Disasters     (2A)

The COVID-19 pandemic as well as other pandemics and disasters have prompted an impressive, worldwide response by governments, industry, and the academic community. Ontologies can play a significant role in search, data description, interoperability and harmonization of the increasingly large data sources that are relevant to disasters such as the COVID-19 pandemic. The Ontology Summit 2022 examined the overall landscape of disasters and related ontologies. A framework consisting of a set of dimensions was developed to characterize this landscape. The framework was applied to health-related disasters, environmental disasters, as well as aerospace and cyberspace disasters. It was found that there are many cross-domain linkages between different kinds of disasters and that ontologies developed for one kind of disaster can be repurposed for other kinds. A representative sample of projects that have been developing and using ontologies for disaster monitoring and response management is presented to illustrate best practices and lessons learned. The Communiqué ends by presenting the findings and recommendations of the summit.     (2B)

Agenda     (2C)

  • 12:00 to 13:00 EDT Planning for Ontology Summit 2022 Video Recording     (2C1)
  • Reminder that Daylight Savings Time (Summer Time in Europe) ends on 31 October in Europe but on 7 November in the US and Canada. So the meeting time on next week on 3 November will be one hour earlier in Europe.     (2C2)

Ontology Summit 2022 Theme and Tracks     (2D)

Theme: Dealing with Disasters     (2D1)

The COVID-19 pandemic as well as other pandemics and disasters have prompted an impressive, worldwide response by governments, industry, and the academic community. Ontologies can play a significant role in search, data description, interoperability and harmonization of the increasingly large data sources that are relevant to disasters such as the COVID-19 pandemic. This summit will examine the role that ontologies can play in disasters. The first track will be an overview of the notion of disaster. The other tracks will examine how the different kinds of disaster are employing ontologies.     (2D2)

  • Track 1: Disaster attributes     (2D4)
    • There are several incompatible definitions for the notion of disaster and for related terminology by national and international agencies.     (2D4A)
    • The information needed for the complex events of predicting, monitoring, mitigating and managing disasters and risks is complex and spans many organizations (both governmental and non-governmental), countries, languages and cultures.     (2D4B)
    • Some examples of disaster attributes include: geo-temporal extent, categories of risks and types of disasters, and sources, such as natural and deliberate.     (2D4C)
  • Track 2: Pandemics     (2D5)
    • Ongoing pandemics include tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS and COVID-19.     (2D5A)
  • Track 3: Environment Disasters     (2D6)
    • Examples include climate change, environmental pollution, wildfires, floods and habitat loss.     (2D6A)
  • Track 4: Space Disasters     (2D7)

Conference Call Information     (2E)

Attendees     (2F)

Discussion     (2G)

[12:25] Mike Bennett: If we want to look at overview / spectrum stuff some time, would it make sense to include pragmatics also (the role of context in determining meanings of symbols)     (2G1)

[12:26] RaviSharma: We discussed Lifecycle, Earth resources, pandemic and complex event processing     (2G2)

[12:27] AlexShkotin: role of ontology in disaster sounds funny - like as a disaster     (2G3)

[12:27] RaviSharma: role of ontologies in natural and human made disasters     (2G4)

[12:28] Mike Bennett: The potential value of ontologies in disaster scenarios?     (2G5)

[12:29] janet singer: Alex, that may be seen more clearly in hindsight     (2G6)

[12:31] Ram D. Sriram: Role of Ontologies in Natural and Man-made Disasters     (2G7)

[12:31] AlexShkotin: Janet, in the future     (2G8)

[12:33] AlexShkotin: It's like role of ontologies in Information Systems deal with Disasters.     (2G9)

[12:34] Mike Bennett: The issue is the absence of barriers to entry: people who don't know what they don't know, are able to create OWL files (syntax) and think they have dealt with semantics.     (2G10)

[12:36] AlexShkotin: Mike this is why every OWL2 ontology must refer to real texts where axioms came from.     (2G11)

[12:36] Mike Bennett: The firm as a whole needs to have something that formally situates syntax, semantics, semiotics and pragmatics. With that they will identify the need for the 3rd skill-set Gary mentioned just now - the not-the-IT, not-the-SME person who understands about semantics.     (2G12)

[12:37] janet singer: Mike, Definitely pragmatics needs to be brought out from the shadows for a systematic overview     (2G13)

[12:37] Mike Bennett: @Alex what's missing is someone who understands the (non trivial) relationships between texts and concepts.     (2G14)

[12:40] AlexShkotin: @Mike, any way when we verbalize ontology to text we need approval of this text from experts and proved texts.     (2G15)

[12:41] Douglas R. Miles:     (2G16)

[12:49] AlexShkotin: @Mike my point is that for ontologists as we known them it is forbidden to write their own texts - they must formalize existing texts     (2G20)

[12:54] Gary BC: Example of ESIP modeling some of the wildfires info flow https://esip.figshare.com/ndownloader/files/28828173     (2G21)

[12:56] AlexShkotin: It should be mention that for big pandemic disasters math models are a key point.     (2G22)

[12:59] RaviSharma: thanks Ken for the suggestions.     (2G23)

[13:00] Douglas R. Miles: Thank you Ken     (2G24)

Resources     (2H)

Previous Meetings     (2I)


Next Meetings     (2J)